History / Timeline 

The Tokyo Budo-kan was born as a base to practice the time-honored Japanese tradition of martial arts in a new era, and expand it into the future. The building is also gathering acclaim for its novel design, rich in artfulness appropriate for an international metropolis like Tokyo.

Top > Tokyo Budo-kan > History / Timeline

History of Tokyo Budo-kan

Tokyo Metropolitan Government opened Tokyo Budo-kan in February 1990 to serve as a martial arts palace that would continue the time-honored Japanese tradition of martial arts, and help to better spread and expand it into the future. Based on the idea that “martial arts are art”, the Tokyo Budo-kan’s facade is built out of cascading diamond shapes, a design which evokes fixtures of Japan’s natural environment: clouds, ocean, mountains, and people. Each dojo, martial arts training hall, within the building is rich in detailed artfulness, making the facility an appropriate fixture for an international metropolis like Tokyo.


Timeline

March 1988 Construction begins on the Metropolitan Tokyo Budo-kan
December 1988 Construction is completed, and the facility’s formal name is changed from Metropolitan Budo-kan to Tokyo Budo-kan
February 1990 Tokyo Budo-kan opens with an opening ceremony. Hosts the Tokyo Martial Arts Festival (grand opening)
April 1991 Remodeling of the Tokyo Budo-kan and training room;
the remodeled training room wins the 1991 Architectural Institute of Japan Prize
February 2002 Hosts the Tokyo Budo-kan Cup
March 2002 The Tokyo Budo-kan symbol flag is established
May 2002 Rental of the tea ceremony room for a charge begins
November 2002 Business commemorating the 400th anniversary of the establishment of Edo Prefecture;
hosts the Tokyo Budo-kan Variety Show
December 2002 Business commemorating the 400th anniversary of the establishment of Edo Prefecture;
hosts the Classical Martial Arts Exhibition
March 2011 Facility accepted persons who could not return home due to the impact of the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, which struck on March 11 (now known as the Great East Japan Earthquake)
From March 17, Tokyo Budo-kan halts normal operation to serve as a shelter for refugees of the Fukushima nuclear accident related to the Great East Japan Earthquake

Present-day Tokyo Budo-kan

現在の東京武道館

Present-day Tokyo Budo-kan

Presently, Tokyo Budo-kan is expressing a new scenic aesthetic, on its grounds and within and without the building, with original and ambitious sculptures by five artists that evoke the themes earth, water, fire, wind, and sky. Because the structure is within Tokyo Metropolitan Higashi Ayase Park, features like the open terrace running north-south provide a spacious environment.

ページの上部へ戻る
「2017ジュニアスポーツアジア交流大会」未来(あした)への道1000km 縦断リレー東京都地域スポーツクラブサポートネットスポーツTOKYOインフォメーション